Angina Chest Pain

Chest Pain Angina Nursing Care Plans

Nursing Diagnosis for Angina Chest Pain Nursing Care Plans for CP

5 Nursing Care Plans for Angina

Angina is a medical condition characterized by chest pain as a result of reduced blood supply to the heart.

The types of angina are stable, unstable, prinzmetal, and microvascular angina.

During an angina episode, the chest pain may radiate to the shoulders, neck, back, jaw, or arms. C

hest pain may be accompanied with dizziness, fatigue, shortness of breath, and nausea.

Treatments for angina include medications, surgical intervention, and lifestyle changes.

Aside from Decreased Cardiac Output and Acute Pain (as discussed in our Nursing Study Guide for Angina), below are 5 additional nursing care plans for a patient with angina.

  1. Nursing Diagnosis: Activity intolerance related to reduced oxygen supply to the heart, as evidenced by fatigue, overwhelming lack of energy, verbalization of tiredness, generalized weakness, and shortness of breath upon exertion

Desired Outcome: The patient will demonstrate active participation in necessary and desired activities and demonstrate increase in activity levels.

InterventionsRationales
Assess the patient’s activities of daily living, as well as actual and perceived limitations to physical activity. Ask for any form of exercise that he/she used to do or wants to try.To create a baseline of activity levels and mental status related to fatigue and activity intolerance.
Encourage progressive activity through self-care and exercise as tolerated. Explain the need to reduce sedentary activities such as watching television and using social media in long periods. Alternate periods of physical activity with 60-90 minutes of undisturbed rest.To gradually increase the patient’s tolerance to physical activity. To avoid triggering angina by allowing the patient to pace activity versus rest.
Teach deep breathing exercises and relaxation techniques.  To allow the patient to relax and to facilitate effective stress management.  
Refer the patient to physiotherapy / occupational therapy team as required.To provide a more specialized care for the patient in terms of helping him/her build confidence in increasing daily physical activity.
Chest Pain Angina Nursing Care Plan 1
  • Nursing Diagnosis: Deficient Knowledge related to new diagnosis of angina as evidenced by patient’s verbalization of “I want to know more about my new diagnosis and care”

Desired Outcome: At the end of the health teaching session, the patient will be able to demonstrate sufficient knowledge of angina and its management.

InterventionsRationales
Assess the patient’s readiness to learn, misconceptions, and blocks to learning (e.g. denial of diagnosis or poor lifestyle habits).To address the patient’s cognition and mental status towards the new diagnosis of angina and to help the patient overcome blocks to learning.
Explain what angina (specific to the type of angina that the patient is diagnosed with) and its treatment and management. Avoid using medical jargons and explain in layman’s terms.To provide information on angina, its pathophysiology, and management in the simplest way possible.
Educate the patient about lifestyle changes that can help manage angina, particularly the cessation of smoking, low cholesterol diet, blood pressure control, stress management, and increased physical activity/ exercise.   Refer to smoking cessation team if patient gives consent.Smoking cessation, low cholesterol diet, blood pressure control, stress management, and increased physical activity/ exercise may prevent angina episodes and lower the risk for the development of coronary artery disease (CAD). A smoking cessation team can provide further help and advice on how to stop smoking and can also monitor the patient’s progress when he/she is back in the community.
Inform the patient the details about the prescribed medications (e.g. drug class, use, benefits, side effects, and risks) to treat angina. Ask the patient to repeat or demonstrate the self-administration details to you.To inform the patient of each prescribed drug and to ensure that the patient fully understands the purpose, possible side effects, adverse events, and self-administration details.
Educate the patient about deep breathing exercises and relaxation techniques.To reduce stress levels and promote client comfort.
Chest Pain Angina Nursing Care Plan 2
  • Nursing Diagnosis: Anxiety related to situational crisis due to angina episode as evidenced by fatigue, overwhelming lack of energy, verbalization of helplessness, restlessness, and expression of fear of death

Desired Outcome: The patient will verbalize awareness of anxiety and will be able to demonstrate effective coping strategies.

InterventionsRationales
Assess the patient’s level of anxiety by using open-ended questions such as “How are you feeling about your new diagnosis and treatment?”To allow the patient to openly express their concerns about diagnosis and treatment.
Encourage the patient to express any concerns, feelings, and fears. Advice the next-of-kin/ significant others to practice active listening when communicating with the patient.Verbal expression of feelings and fears can help avoid internal emotional turmoil and negative-self talk. Family and significant others can provide adequate emotional support to the patient by active listening.
Teach deep breathing exercises and relaxation techniques such as guided imagery.  To allow the patient to relax and to facilitate effective stress management.  
Refer the patient to a psychologist if the patient gives consent.To provide a more specialized care for the patient in terms of helping him/her develop effective coping strategies to combat anxiety.
Chest Pain Angina Nursing Care Plan 3

4. Nursing Diagnosis: Fatigue related to decreased oxygen supply to the heart as evidenced by overwhelming lack of energy, verbalization of tiredness, generalized weakness, and shortness of breath upon exertion

Desired Outcome: The patient will establish adequate energy levels and will demonstrate active participation in necessary and desired activities.

InterventionsRationales
Ask the patient to rate fatigue level (mild, moderate, or severe fatigue).     Assess the patient’s activities of daily living, as well as actual and perceived limitations to physical activity. Ask for any form of exercise that he/she used to do or wants to try.To create a baseline of activity levels, degree of fatigability, and mental status related to fatigue and activity intolerance.
Encourage progressive activity through self-care and exercise as tolerated. Explain the need to reduce sedentary activities such as watching television and using social media in long periods. Alternate periods of physical activity with rest and sleep.To gradually increase the patient’s tolerance to physical activity. Sedentary lifestyle is a risk factor to develop coronary artery disease related to angina.
Encourage the patient to follow a low cholesterol, high caloric diet. Refer to the dietitian as needed.To increase energy levels while promoting a lower risk for angina and coronary artery disease.
Teach deep breathing exercises and relaxation techniques.   Provide adequate ventilation in the room.To allow the patient to relax while at rest. To allow enough oxygenation in the room.
Refer the patient to physiotherapy / occupational therapy team as required.To provide a more specialized care for the patient in terms of helping him/her build confidence in increasing daily physical activity.
Chest Pain Angina Nursing Care Plan 4

5. Nursing Diagnosis: Powerlessness related to chronic illness and hospitalizations due to angina episodes

Desired Outcome: The patient will express a sense of control in terms of physical, mental, and emotional health, as well as self-care.

InterventionsRationales
Assess the factors that contribute to the patient’s sense of powerlessness. Observe for signs of depression, hopelessness, and apathy.To identify the factors that give rise to the patient’s sense of powerlessness. To check the patient’s mental health.
Encourage the patient to express any concerns regarding health management as well as any feelings of powerlessness. Advice the next-of-kin/ significant others to practice active listening when communicating with the patient.Verbal expression of feelings and fears can help avoid internal emotional turmoil and negative-self talk. Family and significant others can provide adequate emotional support to the patient by active listening.
Refer to the community nursing team and social health team as needed.  Powerlessness may involve the inability of the patient to take angina medications properly, thus there may be a need for a community health nurse to monitor the patient’s pharmacologic therapy. It may also affect the patient’s activities of daily living, so a social health care worker may be required.
Refer the patient to a psychologist if the patient gives consent.To provide a more specialized care for the patient in terms of helping him/her develop effective coping strategies that help the patient regain a sense of personal control.
Chest Pain Angina Nursing Care Plan 5

Angina can be an overwhelming medical condition to the client, so effective nursing care is required to combat activity intolerance, fatigue, lack of knowledge, and feelings of anxiety and powerlessness.

References

Ackley, B. J., Ladwig, G. B., Makic, M. B., Martinez-Kratz, M. R., & Zanotti, M. (2020). Nursing diagnoses handbook: An evidence-based guide to planning care. St. Louis, MO: Elsevier.

Gulanick, M., & Myers, J. L. (2017). Nursing care plans: Diagnoses, interventions, & outcomes. St. Louis, MO: Elsevier.     

Ignatavicius, D. D., Workman, M. L., Rebar, C. R., & Heimgartner, N. M. (2018). Medical-surgical nursing: Concepts for interprofessional collaborative care. St. Louis, MO: Elsevier.

Silvestri, L. A. (2020). Saunders comprehensive review for the NCLEX-RN examination. St. Louis, MO: Elsevier.

Facebooktwitterredditpinterestmail

Check Also

Colorectal Cancer

Colorectal Cancer Nursing Diagnosis Interventions and Care Plans

Colorectal Cancer NCLEX Review Care Plans Nursing Study Guide on Colorectal Cancer Colon cancer is …

One comment

  1. Shangwa

    Great

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.